13 Different Cherry Shrimp (Neocaridina) Types: More Than Just Red!

Different Cherry Shrimp Types

Do you know cherry shrimps can be of different types? I have already explained different grades of cherry shrimps. However, in this article, I’ll discuss what are the different types of cherry shrimps that you can keep in your aquarium.

Some of these types are mostly available in the fish stores, whereas some are extremely rare. If you are a beginner, the names can get confusing sometimes and you may face a hard time distinguishing between two different types.

Don’t worry. I faced that too! With time and experience, you’ll eventually get good at identifying different types of the cherry shrimps.

Let’s start with the most common one: Red Cherry Shrimp!

Want to get a printable version of this infographic? Click here! [If you want to use this infographic on your website, please link back to this post as the source!]

1. Red Cherry Shrimp

red cherry shrimp overview and facts
Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi ‘Red’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.5 to 7.5
GH6-8 ppm
KH1-4 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Red cherry shrimps are probably the most common freshwater dwarf shrimp species that are kept in the aquarium. Since they are very easy to care for, most beginners start their shrimp keeping journey with red cherry shrimps.

Red cherry shrimps don’t require very large tank. A 5 gallon tank should be suffice to keep a colony of 10 red cherry shrimps. As they are a type of neocaridina shrimps, they are not that much picky about water parameters.

However, if you want to breed them successfully, you should aim for the water parameter ranges mentioned above.

If you want to buy the best-quality Red Cherry Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

Red cherry shrimps do fine in a wide range of temperatures. However, the most ideal range for them is between 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. I have seen they breed most successfully in this temperature range.

Owner: Kaz Brown

As for keeping red cherry shrimps, you should keep it like any other cherry shrimps. For more details, check out my huge guide on how to setup a cherry shrimp tank.

Red cherry shrimps require plenty of hiding places, plants, and moss in their tank. It is required for them to feel safe in the tank. The more plants you can provide, the better they will be. You can check out my recommendation on the best plants and moss for cherry shrimps.

Like any other freshwater dwarf shrimp, it is not recommended to keep red cherry shrimps with other tank mates. Red cherry shrimps are very peaceful in nature. But they often fall prey to other hungry fishes. Even a school of tetra or barn can be deadly for the red cherry shrimp babies. So, I will recommend keeping them in a ‘Shrimp Only’ tank. However, if you do want to keep some tank mates, check out my article on ideal tank mates for cherry shrimp.

Red cherry shrimps can be graded depending on their color. The most popular grades are:

  • Normal red cherry shrimp
  • Sakura red cherry shrimp
  • Fire red shrimp
  • Painted red shrimp
  • Bloody mary shrimp
  • Kanoko shrimp etc.

If you want to know details about each of the grades, check out my article on cherry shrimp grading.

Breeding red cherry shrimps is extremely easy. If you ensure the basic things they require, they’ll breed like crazy. They just need good quality food, ideal water parameters and lots of plants in the tank for breeding. For successful breeding, you can check out my guide on how to breed cherry shrimps.

Feeding red cherry shrimps isn’t hard either. They mostly live on algae and biofilm which naturally develop in the tank. I also feed them a good commercial shrimp food 2-3 times a week. Here you can check out my detailed cherry shrimp feeding guide.


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13 Different Cherry Shrimp Types Infographic

Want to get a printable version of this infographic? Click here! [If you want to use this infographic on your website, please link back to this post as the source!]

2. Yellow Cherry Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi ‘Yellow’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Like red cherry shrimps, yellow cherry shrimps are also very easy to care for. They don’t need much care. Their preferred water parameters are almost similar to the red cherry shrimps. They don’t need any special substrate to live. I’ll suggest keeping them in a 5 gallon tank at least.

For filtration, you can either use a sponge or a matten filter. I love matten filters in my shrimp tank. They work just awesome. Click here to know more about filtration for cherry shrimps.

If you want to buy the best-quality Yellow Cherry Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

Owner: Kaz Brown

Like red cherry shrimps, the yellow ones don’t do well with tank mates either. They prefer to live in a shrimp only tank. However, you can keep some snails if you want. My favorite snail to keep in a shrimp tank is Malaysian Trumpet Snail.

For successful breeding, keep lots of plants, moss, driftwood or Indian Almond Leaves in the tank. Cherry shrimps, whatever the type is, need these items in their tank. They ensure a healthy environment for the yellow cherry shrimps.

Diet is similar to the red cherry shrimps. They mainly live on algae and biofilm. You can feed them a good commercial shrimp food 2-3 times a week. I also offer my shrimps blanched vegetable once or twice a month to spice up their diet.

For breeding, you don’t need to do much. Just provide the yellow cherry shrimps enough moss, plants, good quality food and ideal water parameters, they’ll breed like crazy!

3. Blue Dream Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var ‘Blue Dream’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit
pH7.0 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS200-300 ppm

As the name suggests, blue dream shrimps are famous for their stunning blue color. Like the other ones, they are also very easy to care for. Blue dream shrimps are very much appreciated for bringing a striking color to the aquarium. They stand out perfectly against a dark substrate.

Blue dream shrimps are very low demanding. They scavenge a lot. They mainly live on biofilm and algae. However, to maintain the color, you can feed them a good commercial shrimp food like Bacter AE.

Not only for color, they are very effective for keeping the tank clean too. Moreover, blue dream shrimps don’t require specific water parameters for thriving. They can withstand a wide range of water parameters as well as temperature.

Owner: Natalie Skinner

If you want to buy the best-quality Blue Dream Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

Breeding is also very easy. Just give them high-quality food, lots of plants and moss, fresh and clean environment. Soon you’ll see many baby blue shrimps roaming around in the tank.

Many people often wonder and ask me how blue dream shrimp were first bred. They are a result of selective breeding of the red cherry shrimp. Blue dream shrimps were directly bred from another popular cherry shrimp type, Blue Velvet Shrimp. This direct breeding line gives blue dream shrimps their dark & rich blue color.

Sexing blue dream shrimps is similar to any other type of cherry shrimps. The female ones are typically larger when they are sexually matured. The females also have a larger tail and form a saddle inside the body. The saddle stores the eggs before they are fertilized. Check out my guide to know more about how to identify the gender of cherry shrimps.

See also  10+ Ideal Tank Mates For Cherry Shrimp [Chart, Picture, Risk]

If you want to breed blue dream shrimps, I’ll suggest to start with at least 10 shrimps. This ensures a good male to female ratio in the shrimp colony for breeding. Keep the shrimps in a 10 gallon tank so that you won’t have to upgrade the tank immediately even if the blue dream shrimps have lots of babies.

When the female blue dream shrimps develop unfertilized eggs, they molt and release a type of pheromone which makes the male ones crazy for breeding and fertilizing the eggs. Once fertilized, the eggs take about 2 weeks to gestate.

Blue dream shrimps are perfect for keeping whether you are a beginner or advanced shrimp keeper. The only problem is, they are not readily available in all the fish stores like red cherry shrimps.

You can check out the online shrimp websites to see if they have these shrimps in their collection.

4. Black Rose Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi ‘Black rose’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS150-200 ppm

Do you want a black color shrimp that is as gorgeous as Black King Kong Caridinia var. but easy to care for like a cherry shrimp? Well, presenting the Black Rose Shrimp.

This is shrimp is a great choice for those who want something exceptional in their shrimp tank. Something that can make others keep looking at their shrimp tank for hours without blinking! Yes, black rose shrimps are that gorgeous and probably one of my most favorite types of cherry shrimps.

They are very easy to care for like any other cherry shrimps. Keep them in a 10 gallon tank at least. For filtration, you can choose either sponge or matten filter. I’ll obviously recommend a matten filter as I love those.

Black rose shrimps are not very picky about their water parameters. Just try to keep the parameters within their ideal range. Also, they can withstand a wide range of temperature.

These shrimps will appreciate a heavily planted tank with lots of moss, moss balls and plants. This also encourages them to breed more. You can also find caves in the fish stores that work great as hiding places.

If you really want, you can keep small schooling fishes with black rose shrimps. As black rose shrimps breed pretty quickly, you won’t be missing anything even if some of the fries end up in the bellies of other tank mates. However, if you want to breed black rose shrimps seriously, just keep them in a shrimp-only tank.

The diet for black rose shrimps is easy and straightforward. They love biofilm in their tank. Also, black rose shrimps feed on some types of soft algae. For keeping the color gorgeous, you can feed them Bacter AE 2-3 times a week. Black rose shrimps can benefit from a calcium-rich diet.

Breeding black rose shrimps is just as straightforward as breeding any other cherry shrimps. However, due to the solid black color, the saddle of the females is not visible. So, you won’t notice the eggs until they are fertilized and moved towards the belly. The fertilized eggs take about 30 days for hatching.

For breeding purposes, keep at least 10 black rose shrimps in the colony. This will ensure a good male-to-female ratio.

If you want to buy the best-quality Black Rose Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

5. Snowball Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina Palmata var. White
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 8.0
GH4-12 ppm
KH3-8 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Snowball shrimp is the white variance of the neocaridina Palmata. It was first selectively bred in Germany. This type is widely appreciated for its snow-white color and low demanding nature. Snowball shrimps are just as easy to care for as any cherry shrimps.

Do you know why these shrimps are called Snowballs? Because their eggs are pure white just like snowballs!

I have already specified the water parameters for snowball shrimps. Frankly, they can live in a wide range of water parameters. Even they can withstand a large range of temperature. However, for breeding purposes, try to aim for the ideal range as specified above.

Not only for great looks, you can keep these shrimps for their algae-eating abilities too. Many shrimp keepers have said their tank got cleaned just after a couple of months of keeping snowball shrimps. Along with algae, you should also feed a supplementary food like Bacter AE for keeping the color top-notch.

Owner: Lynne Calvin

If you want to buy the best-quality Snowball Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

I’ll strongly advise against overfeeding the shrimps. I feed supplementary food to my cherry shrimps 2-3 times a week. Even it is okay to skip feeding for a few days. Don’t worry about it. These shrimps can go on perfectly without feeding for a few days as the tank already has a ton of natural food for them: algae and biofilm.

Just like any other cherry shrimp types, snowball shrimps also breed pretty easily and quickly. From eggs to hatching, it takes about 45 days. You can easily tell when the eggs are close to hatching by identifying a set of eyes on the snow-white eggs.

Snowball shrimps are absolutely peaceful creatures. They are quite active too. If the shrimps feel safe, they’ll pass all-day grazing on the plants, moss, decorations, and leaves.

Copper is deadly for snowball shrimps, actually for any freshwater dwarf shrimp for that matter. Make sure copper doesn’t leach into the shrimp tank in any way.

6. Blue Pearl Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis
OriginGermany
Care LevelEasy
Temperature68 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.5 to 7.5
GH3-10 ppm
KH1-4 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Blue Pearl shrimps are one of the newer additions to shrimp keeping world. Though this particular variant was first bred in Germany, blue pearl shrimps very quickly made their way to the USA for their stunning blue color. According to shrimp breeders, blue pearl shrimp is the first truly bred blue dwarf shrimp.

Blue pearl shrimps don’t need much to live. In fact, the care is pretty similar to any other type of cherry shrimps. Just ensure the basic things like ideal water parameters, fresh & clean water, lots of plants, high-quality food and your blue pearl shrimps will be happy to live and breed in the tank. Though blue pearl shrimps can withstand a wide range of parameters, you need to be consistent with it otherwise they can get stressed.

Blue pearl shrimps eat almost anything and they love to scavenge through the tank. They eat some types of algae and biofilm. However, you’ll need to feed other supplementary foods for proper growth. Like I’ve said earlier, I feed my shrimps Bacter AE for their proper growth and color. You can also feed the shrimps blanched vegetable once in a while to spice up their diet.

Breeding blue pearl shrimps doesn’t demand any extra care or setup. Just make sure the colony has a good male to female ratio and you’ll see lots of baby blue pearl shrimps in no time (Of course the setup needs to be right!).

They are very peaceful creatures. However, I won’t recommend keeping them with other tank mates as most fishes will try to nib the adults or have a go at the babies.

Baby pearl shrimps are not as common as red cherry shrimps. They are considered “prized shrimps” and you need to take proper care of them.

7. Green Jade Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Green’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit
pH7.0 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS200-300 ppm

The dark green color of Green Jade Shrimps makes them stand out in the dark substrate. They are relatively a new addition to the shrimp keeping world and I must say, they have already gone quite popular among the shrimp keepers.

Green Jade Shrimps are easy to care for like any other cherry shrimp. They are very active and love to scavenge the tank. These shrimps eat soft algae and biofilm. They thrive best in a heavily planted tank. Not only for color, you can keep these little buggers to keep your tank clean too!

Green Jade Shrimps are selective bred from the Red Cherry Shrimps line. The range of colors that shrimp breeders got were red -> brown -> blue -> yellow -> green.

The color Green Jade Shrimps can vary. Some shrimps have green stripes and spots over a translucent yellow body. Some shrimps have a varying pattern of bright green color. I have also seen Green Jade Shrimps that are dark as emerald.

Sexing green jade shrimps is like any other cherry shrimp. You’ll have to wait until they are sexually matured. The female ones are comparatively larger, form a saddle and have bigger tails. The bigger tail is helpful for fanning the eggs once they are fertilized and move towards the belly.

Green Jade Shrimps are pretty forgiving shrimps. You can keep them in a wide range of parameters. It doesn’t have to be the ones specified above. However, the thing you can’t allow is inconsistency. Shrimps suffer most due to inconsistent water parameters and get stressed easily.

See also  Is Cherry Shrimp Safe For Live Feeding?

Feeding them can be very straightforward. Just feed them a good shrimp food 2-3 times a week depending on the amount of algae and biofilm your tank has. The supplementary food can be algae wafer, Bacter AE, shrimp pellet, etc. The important thing here is to not overfeed the shrimps.

Overfeeding causes 90% of the problems that shrimp keepers face.

Breeding them is not rocket science either. Just ensure there are enough males and females in the colony. If you do everything right and the environment is perfect, you’ll see lots of baby green shrimps soon in the tank. The eggs need about 2 weeks to gestate.

You won’t need to offer anything extra for the fries. They’ll start to eat what the adults eat and get bigger very quickly.

8. Blue Velvet Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Blue’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Blue velvet shrimps are widely appreciated for their bright blue colors. They are just like red cherry shrimps, but blue in color. The care requirement, diet and breeding is almost same as red cherry shrimps.

I feel like I am repeating myself here. But the care and housing requirement is same for almost all cherry shrimp types. Just make sure you keep them in a 10 gallon tank at least. Keep lots of plants and moss in the plant to make the blue velvet shrimps feel safe.

The shrimps should be quite active in the tank and graze on algae & biofilm. However, you do need to offer a supplementary food 2 or 3 times a week. There is no need to feed them everyday. In fact, it is better to skip feeding for a few days so that there is no chance of overfeeding.

They’ll breed quite vigorously like any other cherry shrimps. You can keep some of the ‘safe’ tank mates with them if you want. But truth be told, no fish is absolutely shrimp safe. If you want to breed them seriously, keep them in a separate tank that is exclusive to them only.

I love the appearance of berried female blue velvet shrimps. When they are berried, the eggs get greenish/yellowish in color. They look quite aesthetic inside the blue body. The eggs can take about a month to hatch. The fries don’t need any special attention other than lots of moss and plants. Soon they’ll grow and start mating themselves.

If you want to buy the best-quality Blue Velvet Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

9. Orange Pumpkin Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Orange’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 7.8
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

As the name suggests, Orange pumpkin shrimps will bring a wonderful hint of orange color to your tank. If you want something that makes your planted tank pop without having to take extensive care of it, then orange pumpkin shrimps will be the right choice.

Like any other cherry shrimps, orange pumpkin shrimps don’t require much. Just keep them in a 10 gallon tank. For substrate, you can either go for a bare bottom tank or tank with filter pool sand. If you want a heavily planted tank, then I’ll suggest eco complete planted aquarium substrate. Here I’ve talked more about substrate for cherry shrimps. I’ll suggest something dark that really makes the color of these shrimps stand out!

For filtration, you can simply go for a sponge filter or a matten filter. Many shrimp keepers believe shrimps don’t need filtration if the tank is heavily planted. It cannot be further than the truth. Every shrimp tank needs a type of filtration.

Owner: Maryanne Young

These shrimps are not fussy about the water parameters. Just try to stay between the specified range. Also, try to make the parameters consistent. Sudden spike or drop of the parameters can really make these shrimps stressed.

If you want, you can keep some tank mates with these shrimps. However, keep in mind that the babies will not be safe from the tank mates, no matter how peaceful they are. I heard stories about otto trying to bite a shrimp too!

If you want to breed them seriously, then keep them in a shrimp only tank. You can have some snails. Snails like Malaysian Trumpet Snails create a better ecological balance in the tank.

Feeding is similar to any other cherry shrimp. Most of the time orange pumpkin shrimps will graze on algae and biofilm. But that doesn’t mean they don’t need anything else. I’ll recommend feeding them a good shrimp food 2-3 times a week depending on the amount of algae your tank has. Also, sometimes you can spice up the diet with blanched vegetables like cucumber, zucchini, spinach, etc.

As Orange Pumpkin Shrimps are not that much popular like their red cherry shrimp cousins, you might face a hard time finding these for sell. Even if you do, the color might not be that much exciting. I’ll suggest searching on the reputable online shrimp sites and check their collection from time to time.

If you want to buy the best-quality Orange Pumpkin Shrimp at the most cost-effective price, check them out. I have found them to be one of the best aquarium shrimp suppliers in the States! Both their shipping policy and Live Arrival Guarantee are awesome for fish keepers like us!

10. Red Onyx Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Red Onyx’
OriginJapan/East Asia
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.2 to 8.0
GH4-12 ppm
KH3-8 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

Red Onyx shrimps have a striking red color like high-grade red cherry shrimps. However, their body has black spots too. The black-red combination makes these shrimps extremely gorgeous.

You’ll be real lucky if you can find these shrimps for sell. They are very rare and most shrimp stores can’t keep them in their collection.

Taking care of them is just as straightforward like any other cherry shrimp. Just do everything you’ll do for a cherry shrimp. However, breeding them and keeping the same coloration can be a bit difficult unless you perform selective breeding.

They are good algae eaters and love to feed on biofilm. Keep in mind to offer a supplementary food few times a week. And I’ll suggest not keeping any tank mates with these gorgeous creatures.

11. Blue Diamond Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Blue Diamond’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature60 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.5 to 8.0
GH6-8 ppm
KH1-4 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

The origin story of Blue Diamond Shrimps is quite interesting. They were first bred from a strain of Chocolate Neo. Till now, their coloration hasn’t got super stable yet. You can find blotches of irregular color pattern on them. However, they are extremely easy to care for just like any cherry shrimp.

Shrimp keepers widely cherish these shrimps for their sapphire like appearance. These shrimps not only bring gorgeousness to the tank, they are also excellent clean-up crew. If the conditions are right, they’ll breed like crazy and soon you’ll have lots of baby blue shrimps jumping around the tank.

Blue Diamond Shrimps do extremely fine in a heavily planted tank. Like other cherry shrimps, they are not very picky about the water parameters. However, they need consistency in the temperature and water parameters. Sudden spike or downfall won’t bring any good to their health.

Blue diamond shrimps are getting more popularity each day for their awesome algae-control and waste-management capabilities. However, they are quite more expensive than regular red cherry shrimps. Even, a single pair can cost you more than $10.

So, be prepared to have a heavy wallet if you want a colony of Blue Diamond Shrimps.

12. Blue-Green Emerald Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Blue-Green’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature64 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit
pH6.8 to 7.5
GH4-12 ppm
KH3-8 ppm
TDS150-250 ppm

This is one of the newest and rarest varieties of neocaridina davidi. This is the new green shrimp in town and shrimp keepers are going crazy over it. This variety boasts itself with a dark-green gorgeous coloration that stands out perfectly on a dark substrate. Most of the shrimps have a green-blue coloration, hence the name Blue-Green emerald.

Like any other cherry shrimp species, this gorgeous one is extremely easy to care for too! They are very hardy and can live in a wide range of water parameters.

Blue-Green emerald shrimps love to scavenge throughout the tank. A large portion of their diet forms with algae and biofilm. They’ll also benefit from a good quality commercial shrimp food. Feed the shrimps a supplemental food 2-3 times a week depending on the amount of algae the tank has.

Blue-Green emerald shrimps are absolutely peaceful. They are very active and scavenge throughout the tank all day long. So, you’ll always find them jumping around in the tank, going from leaf to leaf or scavenging the substrate. Though there are peaceful, I’ll advise against keeping them with other fishes.

Blue-Green emerald shrimps are very rare, they can be quite pricey. Last time I checked, a single piece can cost your around $10. You certainly don’t want such a prized shrimp to go inside other fish’s belly, right?

See also  Cherry Shrimp Care Guide [#1 Resource For Beginners]

The last thing I want to say, don’t overfeed these shrimps. Most of the problems in the shrimp tank are caused due to overfeeding. Feed them in less amount, but higher-quality foods like Bacter AE.

13. Chocolate Shrimp

Scientific NameNeocaridina davidi var. ‘Chocolate’
OriginTaiwan
Care LevelEasy
Temperature65 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit
pH7.0 to 8.0
GH4-8 ppm
KH3-15 ppm
TDS200-300 ppm

As the name suggests, these shrimps have a dark chocolate color and quite popular among the shrimp keeping community. If you have a light-color substrate in the tank, these shrimps will stand out perfectly.

Chocolate shrimps are very easy to care for. They are scavengers and love to scavenge throughout the whole day. The staple portion of their diet forms with algae and biofilm. They also need minerals and vitamins for proper growth. To ensure all the nutrients, I recommend feeding them a good quality shrimp food 2-3 times a week, preferably Bacter AE.

Don’t overfeed the shrimps at all. Also, you can spice up their diet by occasionally offering blanched vegetables. The vegetable can be anything including carrot, cucumber, zucchini, spinach, etc.

Chocolate shrimps can live and breed in wide range of parameters. However, they can’t endure sudden fluctuations of the water parameter. They are quite peaceful and can be an excellent tank mate for a community tank.

However, if you are serious about breeding chocolate shrimps, I will advise you to keep them in a tank exclusive to them only. You can keep some snails like Malaysian Trumpet Snails.

Chocolate shrimps are selectively bred from the Red Cherry Shrimps. These created awesome hues from deep red to dark chocolate. Due to the dark coloration, sometimes these shrimps are also called Black Cherry Shrimps. In some shrimps, there are brown stripes and spots over the translucent yellow body.

Sexing chocolate shrimps is similar to any other cherry shrimps. You’ll have to wait until they are sexually matured. The females are typically bigger, have larger tails and form a saddle inside their body. The saddle stores the eggs until they are fertilized.

If you want to breed Chocolate shrimps, keep a colony of at least 10. If everything is right and there are lots of plants & moss in the tank, the shrimps should start breeding very quickly. Once berried, the eggs take about 2 weeks to gestate. Once the fries hatch, they can take care of themselves instinctively.

How Many Types Of Shrimp Are There?

There are more than 2400 species of shrimp in this world. But, only a small portion of shrimp species are available commercially.

Owner: Ricky Sales

21 Types Of Neocaridina Shrimp

If you talk about the popularity of shrimp species, the name Neocaridina shrimp may come up first in your mind. Due to its hardy nature and low requirements, shrimp hobbyists often prefer Neocaridina shrimp. Moreover, these Neocaridina shrimp will surely catch your attention with their bright coloration.

There is a wide range of diversification in Neocaridina shrimp. I’ve made a small list of Neocaridina shrimp below.

1. Chocolate Shrimp

Chocolate shrimp are also popular as black cherry shrimp. To get shrimp with chocolatey-colored shells, you need to do selective breeding or Red Cherry shrimp. Specific grades of chocolate shrimp may have some dark patches over their brown chocolate-colored shell.

2. Black Rose Shrimp

If you’re a black lover, you must prefer black rose shrimp. This species of Neocaridina shrimp family has a pure black shell. An adult Black Rose shrimp can reach up to 3 inches.

3. Red Rili Shrimp

You shouldn’t get confused between similar-looking red cherry shrimp and Red Rili shrimp. These Neocaridina shrimp species get translucent bands with their bright red-colored head and tail. Since breeding Red Rili shrimp isn’t a difficult task, these shrimp species are not much costlier.

4. Blue Dream Shrimp

Another wonderful color morph of the Neocaridina shrimp family is the blue dream shrimp. These shrimp have won the heart of shrimp hobbyists with their blue coloration, hardy nature, and easy to breed naturally.

5. Blue Diamond Rili Shrimp

If you want something striking in your aquarium, you can choose Black Diamond Rili shrimp. These unique shrimp have glossy shells with a dark blue or black coloration. However, Blue Diamond Rili shrimp is a selectively bred variety for such unique coloration.

6. Snowball Shrimp

Snowball shrimp is one of the most beautiful varieties of the Neocaridina family. These shrimp will add a pure white appearance to your shrimp tank. Another name for snowball shrimp is White Pearl shrimp.

7. Green Jade Shrimp

This rare shrimp morph is too stunning to take your eyes off these shrimp. Green Jade shrimp has several color grades ranging from light lime green to bottle green.

8. Bloody Mary Shrimp

As the name suggests, bloody mary shrimp has a bright red coloration on their shell. Sometimes, you may notice a variety of bloody mary shrimp with translucent red color. This unique morph of Neocaridina shrimp is selectively bred from Chocolate Sakura shrimp.

9. Yellow Fire Shrimp

If any shrimp hobbyists are sunshine yellow lovers, Yellow Fire shrimp will be a great choice for them. Another name for Yellow Fire shrimp is Neon Yellow shrimp.

10. Blue Jelly Shrimp

By selective breeding of Blue Rili shrimp, you can get another unique blue-colored shrimp type of Neocaridina shrimp. Blue Jelly shrimp has a semi-transparent body of light blue coloration. Sometimes, it may appear as a hue of greenish blue color.

11. Orange Fire Shrimp

This Neocaridina shrimp type is an orange color variant of Fire Red shrimp. To achieve the bright orange color, Orange Fire shrimp are selectively bred from Red Cherry shrimp.

12. Orange Rili Shrimp

Orange Rili shrimp are different from Orange Fire shrimp due to their transparent white band. These types of Neocaridina shrimp have orange and white coloration on their shell. Due to having hardy nature, Orange Rili shrimp are a popular choice among beginners.

13. Red Sakura Shrimp

Although people often mistake Red Sakura shrimp for Red Cherry shrimp, this Neocaridina shrimp type is a high-quality variant of Red Cherry shrimp. As a result, these shrimp have darker red coloration with translucent legs.

14. Blue Pearl Shrimp

Another unique Neocaridina shrimp species is the Blue Pearl shrimp. Its icy blue color will surely add additional beauty to your shrimp tank. However, these 1.5-2 inched Blue Pearl shrimp are one of the truest breeding Blue Dwarf shrimp.

15. Red Cherry Shrimp

The most popular and hyped Neocaridina shrimp is the Red Cherry shrimp. You can keep a colony of 10-20 of these cleanup crews together in a tank. These Red Cherry shrimp can cost around $3-$8 per shrimp.

16. Black Sakura Shrimp

Another stunning species of Neocaridina shrimp is Black Sakura shrimp. Its opaque black coloration can readily catch the attention of any shrimp lover. These peaceful shrimp can live up to 2 years within an ideal environment.

17. Jinsha Shrimp

Jinsha shrimp is fun to watch for shrimp hobbyists. These shrimp have an intense mixed coloration of yellow and orange. In addition, you can find dorsal stripes over their attractive shell.

18. Red Onyx Shrimp

Another beginner-friendly Neocaridina shrimp is the Red Onyx shrimp. These shrimp has a chocolaty red shade on their shell. Red Onyx shrimp is a deep maroon to dark brown colored shrimp. Its darker version increases the demand for its price.

19. Carbon Rili Shrimp

Carbon Rili shrimp are selectively bred to get the coloration of blue, black, and white. This special-bred Neocaridina davidi is eye catchy for its translucent patches. Since these shrimp can tolerate fluctuations, they are easy to take care of.

20. Gold Dust Shrimp

Gold Dust shrimp is another striking shrimp with a transparent body. These shrimp have brown to black colored spots all over their transparent body. Since breeding Gold Dust shrimp is difficult, these shrimp are pretty rare in the shrimp world.

21. Super Green Jade Shrimp

One of the rarest Neocaridina shrimp color variants is super Green Jade shrimp. These algae eaters come in several colors. Such as velvety green, yellow, red, and brown.

Owner: Maryanne Young

Neocaridina Shrimp Color Chart

You can find Neocaridina shrimp in varieties of colors. The wild Neocaridina shrimp are mainly green and brown. Sometimes, you may find them in transparent bodies.

But, the breeders prefer experimenting with color by mixing different types of shrimp. The cost of these shrimp varies on the intensity of coloration.

That’s why, you may find a wide range of color morphs shrimp with different grades. In addition, you’ll find varieties of Neocaridina shrimp with different bands, spots, and stripes. These are the results of selective breeding.

I’ve made a small color chart for Neocaridina shrimp here. Let’s check this out.

Neocaridina DavidiNeocaridina Palmata
Red (Red Cherry, Red Sakura, Red Rili)Blue Pearl Shrimp
Orange (Orange Rili, Orange Sakura)White Pearl Shrimp
Green (Green Jade) 
Black (Black Shakura, Carbon Black Rili, Blue Carbon) 
 Yellow (Yellow Rili, Yellow Fire, Yellow Fire Neon Back) 
Violet (Purple Cherry, Purple Zebra) 
Chocolate (Bloody Mary, Chocolate Sakura) 
Blue (Blue Jelly, Blue Rili, Blue Dream) 
White (White Pearl shrimp) 
Ghost 

How big do neocaridina shrimps get?

Neocaridina shrimp generally grow to around 1.5 inches in length for females, and 1.25 inches for males. The females can reach up to around 1.6″/4 cm, while the males stay a bit smaller.

Learn more about cherry shrimp size here!

How big do blue velvet shrimps get?

Blue Velvet Shrimp, which is a species of Neocaridina shrimp, can grow up to 1.5 inches in length for females and 1.25 inches for males, with the largest females reaching up to 2 inches. However, their exact size can vary depending on the individual.

Learn more about blue cherry shrimp care here!

How fast do cherry shrimp grow? 

Cherry shrimp generally take 4-6 months to reach adulthood, but some species can take up to 12 months to fully mature.

They grow rapidly and steadily in an exponential method through three different stages until they reach adulthood. On average, they gain 2.60 grams of weight every week when kept in optimal water conditions and given a high-quality diet.

How to sex neocaridina shrimp?

Sexing Neocaridina shrimp can be challenging, but there are a few key characteristics to look for. One way to sex them is to look for a saddle, which is a yellowish spot behind the head that contains eggs before they are moved to the swimmerettes.

Another way is to look for eggs, which can be seen tucked between a female’s back legs.

Additionally, females are typically larger and less colorful than males, and their mid-section will bend downwards, like the base of the letter U. In contrast, males’ mid-section curves the opposite way, like the top of the letter n.

Learn more about how to determine cherry shrimp gender here!

What is the highest quality cherry shrimp?

Sexing Neocaridina shrimp can be challenging, but there are a few key characteristics to look for. One way to sex them is to look for a saddle, which is a yellowish spot behind the head that contains eggs before they are moved to the swimmerettes.

Another way is to look for eggs, which can be seen tucked between a female’s back legs.

Additionally, females are typically larger and less colorful than males, and their mid-section will bend downwards, like the base of the letter U. In contrast, males’ mid-section curves the opposite way, like the top of the letter n.

Learn more about how to determine cherry shrimp gender here!

The most popular color for Cherry Shrimp is red, which is why they are commonly known as “Red Cherry Shrimp” or “RCS”. Learn more about it’s proper care here!

Conclusion

So, these are the different types of cherry shrimps you can keep as pets. However, not all of them are readily available for sell like red cherry shrimps. So, you may need to look hard for the rare ones!

In this article, I tried to inspire you to become a better shrimp keeper and expand your horizon beyond red cherry shrimps. When we hear about cherry shrimps, most shrimp keepers only think about red cherry shrimps.

But there are many more types of cherry shrimps, and if you want, you can keep them too! I hope I got you enough inspired!

13 Different Cherry Shrimp Types

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Muntaseer Rahman

About Author

Hello, I’m Muntaseer Rahman, the owner of AcuarioPets.com. I’m passionate about aquarium pets like shrimps, snails, crabs, and crayfish. I’ve created this website to share my expertise and help you provide better care for these amazing pets.

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